Calling all divers and snorkellers!

We are looking for records of rare and important marine life. In Shetland we are very fortunate to have a long and varied coastline, home to a wide variety of marine life. Compared to other parts of the UK, the Shetland coastline is relatively well studied thanks to survey work undertaken to support the building of Sullom Voe, work at the NAFC Marine Centre to map important marine habitats and continued government agency survey work. But there are still large amounts of coastline yet to be surveyed.

That’s where we need your help, we are asking divers and snorkellers to report sightings of five key species which are either rare or sensitive to disturbance or are considered of high biological value:

Spiny Lobster. Copyright National Lobster Hatchery
White Cluster Anemone. Copyright Paul Naylor
Fan Mussel. Copyright Dr Keith Hiscock
Burrowing Anemone. Copyright JNCC (Bernard Picton)
Native Oyster. Copyright Paul Naylor

We would also be interested to hear about records of important seabed habitats which are sensitive to disturbance and considered of high biological value:

Maerl. Copyright Rachel Shucksmith
Seagrass Bed. Copyright Paul Naylor
Horse Mussel. Copyright Rachel Shucksmith

In Scotland, these important species have been termed ‘Priority marine features’- Download our PMF Leaflet to find out more. We are still keen to hear of records in locations where these species have been known for a long time, particularly if you have noticed them disappearing or becoming more abundant. Your records can provide important information on changes to these key species and habitats, which might overwise go unnoticed. For instance, seagrass beds in the Vadills are known to have died back, but when this occurred is not clear.

We would also welcome records of any unusual species or invasive species (Shetland’s Marine Non-native Species), or shark and skate eggcases you might spot when diving (Shetland Shark and Skate Eggcase Hunt).